10 Situations – Where It’s Acceptable to Send your Honey Ooey-Gooey Valentine’s Wishes on Facebook

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*You’ve fallen and you can’t get up

*He or she is greater than 50 miles away

*You’re being held captive by Bigfoots in the Rocky Mountains where they just so happen to have a kick-ass wifi signal

*You’re suspicious that they’re engaging in extracurriculars and you need to urinate on the Internet to mark your territory

*A stealth bomber crashed through your living room and the love of your life is on the other side of the wreckage

*You’ve been deployed to Mars

*Every time you post on Facebook a Kit Kat bar and a $100 bill pops out of your laptop

*You have a comfy spot in front of the fireplace and you don’t feel like walking ALL the way down to the man cave.

*Christian Grey has you tethered to a telephone pole and you’re starting to feel guilty… or you’re freezing and you need him to bring you a jacket

*You’re a hopeless romantic who loves their partner and is compelled to SHOUT it from the rooftops (or in stores)… so you don’t puke unicorn glitter on yourself

“I’m singing… I’m in a store and I’m siiiiiiiiiiinging!!!!!

 

❤️ Many of my friends are in fact engaging in this bizarre ritual and for the record, I love those people dearly, but nonetheless they’re all DORKASAURUSES. ❤️

 

Do You Have Disappointed Valentine Syndrome?

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Married, coupled or single, we invite disappointment into our lives the moment we award the key to our happiness to another person. Yet, every Valentine’s Day masses of people rely on others to make their day special.

Big mistake, not only on February 14th, but for the rest of the year as well.

Happiness does not present itself on your doorstep in the form of a heart shaped box, nor will it be discovered tucked amongst a dozen red roses. It can’t be gifted and should never be contingent on the actions and/or affections of others.

Holding onto the notion that one day you’ll be swept off your feet by a knight in shining armor is not only naive, it’s about as probable as being abducted by a Bigfoot.

These spectacularly scripted love scenes mostly only exist in Nicholas Spark novels, on the Hallmark channel and cheesy soap operas.

The deceptive seed responsible for unrealistic romantic expectations is planted early on in children’s happily-ever-after fairy tales, then packaged and distributed to polite conforming society by profit driven retailers.

Expecting to bathe in champagne and rose pedals every Valentine’s Day is like expecting the romantic honeymoon phase of a relationship to last forever. It’s unrealistic, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing… It’s just life.

The honeymoon phase of a relationship is similar to that once-in-a-lifetime dream trip spent drifting the majestic waterways of Venice Italy in a gondola or an exotic island vacation spent surrounded by glistening turquoise waters – blissful and exciting, albeit short lived. Excitement that shoots straight up and rings the bell when struck with a mallet, then POOF, it morphs back into something ordinary, leaving many hopeless romantics disenchanted.

The fact is, you can’t pre-plan or schedule moments where emotional fireworks spontaneously explode in bright brilliant hues of scarlet and fuzzy pink confetti rains from the heavens.

Spontaneous moments are just that… unplanned and unexpected. While these blissfully awesome moments often blow the top off of everything wonderful, be mindful that this is a gift and not something that is necessarily owed to us.

It is up to us to proclaim February 14th as our very own special day to celebrate the loves of our lives; our children, family, pets, friends, acquaintances or simply a day to engage in random acts of kindness at home, at work or in the community.

The authentic warm satisfyingly fuzzy feeling you get from giving, far surpasses the random scraps of affection you feel are owed to you by others. Spouse and/or significant other and family included. You can’t rely on other people for your own happiness. Ever.

Valentine’s Day is probably the biggest kill-joy of all preconceived expectations. Everyone seems to have an ideal picture in their mind of how “it’s supposed to be.” The problem is that the scenario is in your mind and other people don’t have the script, and even if they did, it doesn’t mean they’d meet your expectations.

Be proactive – make an effort to become involved in a charity or cause that you’re passionate about. Giving unconditionally awards us control of our own mindset and is undoubtedly the most noble and satisfying course of action.

Understand that the intention is to give and not necessarily receive praise – as many recipients may not acknowledge your gracious efforts, and that’s okay. When you make giving about you, you nullify the unconditional factor. Give because it feels good.

Switch up this day or the rest of your life, grab the heart-shaped key and celebrate Valentine’s Day on your own loving terms.

10 Reasons Love and Valentine’s Day are not Synonymous

 

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1. Love is not exclusive to romantic couples. Love can include family, friends, animal companions, passions for humanity and causes in general. Loving is a selfless act that does not require an invite. Valentines Day, on the other hand, is often viewed by many as a couples only occasion.

2. Love is a purposeful lifetime commitment; a virtue. Valentines Day is more like the eagerly anticipated celebration you have in kindergarten where you gorge on candy hearts and sugary cupcakes. A short-lived sugar high.

3. Love is the silent acts of kindness exchanged by two or more people that’s not necessarily romantic in nature. Valentine’s Day often resembles a poker game where your hand is a surprise and your expectations are not necessarily in sync with reality. In the end you could end up winning big or leaving with even less than you started with. Love is more of a constant.

4. Love is not synonymous with a couples short lived honey moon phase; on Valentines Day many people expect to recreate a fireworks display so grand, the sky explodes on cue and blissfully rains rose pedals. Expecting or attempting to orchestrate any spontaneous event just because the calendar says so, is a long shot.

5. Loving blends with our every day lives and becomes an effortless endeavor. For some, Valentines Day can be prickly sharp, especially if their significant other has expectations that are unrealistic and/or out of sync with their own.

6. Love is bittersweet. It definitely has its peaks and valleys. Valentine’s Day in all its sweet glory is intended to rival a life-sized gummy bear that’s been dipped in molasses and rolled in pixie stick dust. It can be too much.

7. Love is a beautiful heartfelt emotion that’s free to give and receive. Valentine’s Day is mostly about stuff… even if it’s a fancy dinner; it’s bought and paid for.

8. Love is not boastful nor does it seek public validation on Facebook or Instagram. Valentine’s Day and all it’s materialistic shiny loot are plastered predictably all over social media in an attempt to earn acknowledgement. Insecurity is boastful and needy.

9. Love just happens. Valentine’s Day is a pre-planned event on the calendar that our society is not only conditioned, but pressured into acknowledging.

10. Loving awards one a higher level of satisfaction not found in receiving alone. When you give love it feels warm and fuzzy. Valentines Day on the other hand predictably results in masses of people feeling unloved and lonely, simply because they weren’t pampered within their expectations or are currently lacking the romantic interest of another.

Being part of a couple is not the key to happiness; LOVING within the confines of your present life and social situation are.

The key to happiness belongs to you.

Turn it and be Happy.